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Link Sell Deal – Done

37 minutes ago

Failure: hi
Failure: how are you?
Me: Good thanks – you?

Failure: are you interested in Buying Links
Me: Not personally

Failure: thwn

Failure: can you please send me the email id of SEO Guys

Failure: who are buying Links

Failure: ?
Me: Not really my place to do that unfortunately

Failure: you are in gaming industry
Me: Yes, but I don’t do referrals for links

Failure: that is Not bad

Failure: info.casinocell@gmail.com
Me: not sure what I need that for

Failure: can you send me
Me: send you what?

Failure: email id of your SEO Guys
Me: pistorius@paddypower.com

Failure: he is SEO Manager?
Me: yes

Failure: ok

Failure: can you some other emails as well
Me: no

Failure: do you know some of your friends
Me: I hope I know most of them

Failure: who are looking for links
Me: some might be but not sure who or what kind of links. To be honest, we’d be wasting eachother’s time

Failure: no

Failure: i am selling gambling related link
Me: yeah I get that. I’m not buying though

Failure: some of you friends who are buying ?
Me: they might be. But I have 1,460 friends. I could ask all of them for you…

Failure: can you send the email of friend who are in gaming industry
Me: why?

Failure: i will contact them

Failure: for Selling links
Me: I was going to send them all an email about a Nigerian orphan with a load of money, but this sounds more appealing. Would you mind if I sent the email instead? I’ll give you 10% on the value of the links

Failure: ok

Failure: i will pay you 10% of the links
Me: I was hoping for something closer to 90%

Failure: ?

Failure: ok fine

What is Bitcoin?

If, like me, the advent of Bitcoin has kind of slipped under your radar, and you happen to work in an industry that is now at the stage where it goes beyond the assumption that you know all there is to know about virtual currencies, this little piece will help you understand what Bitcoin is and how and why it has evolved…

what is bitcoin?
why use bitcoin

My Personal History of Mobile Phone Ownership

It all started in 1999 with the Philips/BT Cellnet (remember them!?) C12. Best thing about it was being able to compose your own ringtones using keytones. Was cool until everyone who’d waited a month or two longer had a Nokia and could play Snake.

Philips C12

I finally saw sense and moved to Nokia in 2000. This, the 3210, was the phone inbetween two classics. It had Snake on it (possibly even Snake II)

Nokia 3210

Sticking with Nokia, my uni days in 2001 with this classic Nokia, the 3310. God I wish I still had this (epic battery life). I seem to remember cladding it in some horrific faux metallic case that added about an inch in width and depth (to the phone).

Nokia 3310

Life got serious with the first ever camera phone in 2002. The Nokia 7650. Was awesome until I had it knicked (uninsured) on my 21st birthday.

Nokia 7650

After a few hand-me downs saw me through to my next upgrade in 2003, I went to Samsung for the one and only time, sticking to the slide phone mantra for now with the D800. I recall being livid when they brought out not one, but two upgrades to this within 6 months. Nonetheless, life as a poor student meant I took a cut on the tariff rather than a new phone in 2004.

Samsung D800

The advent of email on your phone and a professional life saw me head to Blackberry in 2005 for the one and only time. The original Blackberry Pearl looked great, but as soon as a smidgen of dust got caught in the tracker ball, it was as good as useless. I recall limping through the last 4 months of the year without the tracker ball altogether – it finally gave way after 30 or so weekly removals to clean. Crap.

Blackberry Pearl

Up next came the concept of music on your phone in 2006. I moved on with the Sony Ericsson W800, which I recall loving. Besides the musical focus, it was a solid phone. No stupid tracker ball or flimsy slider motion.

Sony Ericsson W800

A move overseas to Spain in 2007 came with the delights of my first company phone. The Nokia 6233 was budget to say the least and belonged in 1999. The phone bills were anything but budget as it was a Gibraltar registered phone and the roaming charges in Spain were greater than anywhere else in Europe.

bet365 Tight Bastards

My first foray into dual phone ownership came alongside this farce in 2008. The Nokia E65 was a decent phone, although I recall Vodafone Espana as being a fricking nightmare to deal with.

Nokia E65

Back to the UK in 2010 and my first smartphone, the Android powered HTC Desire HD. Cracking phone, ever-worsening battery life. I stuck with it for a remarkable 26 months.

HTC Desire HD

That brings me to the present day. The all conquering Apple iPhone finally caught my eye with their sixth entrant, the iPhone 5. I’d still go back to ’99 for that Nokia 3310’s awesome battery life though…

iPhone 5

Got to wonder what the future holds…

We’re Recruiting – iGaming Digital Sales & Marketing Executive

Digital Sales & Marketing Executive – £23k-£30k (dependent on experience) plus bonus

A small, but thriving digital marketing agency catering the online gambling market is growing and looking for a hungry, target driven digital sales and marketing executive with a broad range of talents for a multi-function role. The chosen candidate will be assigned responsibility for managing existing and new client relationships, entailing the recruitment and management of affiliate partners in the iGaming sector, and assisting the Directors in acquiring new clients to grow the business. The role will be based in a new office in Tonbridge, Kent and reporting directly into the Company Director based there. This is an excellent opportunity for candidates seeking to rapidly develop their career in a fast-paced, exciting industry.

Main responsibilities of a Digital Sales & Marketing Executive:

• Build close working relationships with the affiliate program clients and top tier affiliates.
• Grow the company’s client base by identifying new managed and software licensee partners and other opportunities.
• Identify, evaluate, propose and launch initiatives and campaigns to drive client customer acquisition through the affiliate channel with the aim of developing best in class programs.
• Work closely with the Directors to ensure project deliveries are to a high standard and on time.
• Work closely with the Directors to ensure client affiliate programs are managed to a high standard.
• Review & propose recommendations on current activity, commission terms & affiliate portfolio to maximise campaign performance.
• Negotiate and review commercial arrangements with affiliates on behalf of clients with regards to campaign delivery and performance.
• Actively contribute to ‘Ideas generation’ with a view to enhancing and developing a best in class digital offering.
• The role will involve travel to relevant iGaming industry events, in the UK and mainland Europe.

Must haves of a Digital Sales & Marketing Executive:

• Fundamental ability to self-start, work in a small team, multitask and work to deadlines
• Ability to analyse performance data and metrics and confidence in making decisions regarding campaign direction based on insight
• Excellent interpersonal skills, numerical analysis and communication skills
• Capability to manage projects to ensure delivery of multiple / overlapping streams of work
• Ability to learn quickly and get “stuck in”
• Strong commercial focus
• Previous sales experience
• A degree or relevant qualification

Desirables of a Digital Sales & Marketing Executive:

• Good understanding and experience of managing affiliate programs
• Previous experience in the online gambling industry
• Previous business development experience
• Previous agency account experience

Email your CV and covering letter to tom@gameon.im to apply

More Linkbuyer Fun and Games

Today

Mug Linkbuyer: hi
Me: hi there
Mug Linkbuyer: we are selling Gambling Links
Mug Linkbuyer: ?
Me: and?
Me: Mug Linkbuyer: if you are Intrested tel me
Me: interested in what?
Mug Linkbuyer: Gambing Links
Me: The sweat glands of a cow are in its nose
Me: now that is interesting
Mug Linkbuyer: tere maa ke choot
Mug Linkbuyer: now tat is intresting
Me: Maria isn’t a very Hindi sounding name
Me: I don’t buy links – I like doing affiliate deals that get me traffic
Mug Linkbuyer: ok
Mug Linkbuyer: Gambling affilates?
Me: yep. It’s what I do
Mug Linkbuyer: show me
Me: show you what?
Mug Linkbuyer:gambling affilate
Me: I was worried you were asking for something else there

New Year’s Resolutions…

Rather than half heartedly tell virtually nobody what my New Year’s resolutions are, I thought I’d tell virtually nobody by posting them to my blog in the vain hope that my one or two readers pull me up on neglecting them!

1) Write a recommendation for one of my LinkedIn contacts every working day this year (it could be you!)
2) Train for the London Marathon
3) Run the London Marathon
4) Complete the London Marathon
5) Be nice to Anthony Hodgetts (NB only when not provoked)
6) Not to get annoyed by any Gangnam Style comparisons
7) Remember to tell the wife plans I make with at least 24 hours notice
8) Don’t procrastinate by talking about what I’m going to do… just do it (self-defeating with this blog post)
9) Take a family holiday in the Summer
10) To only partake in alcohol consumption prior to the London Marathon between 2nd February and 10th February (inclusive)

Not asking much of myself there, am I?

Affiliate Management – How to Sell Your Brand

There are lots of ways in which one can sell a brand. That brand has no doubt undergone some form of brand development to firmly attempt to establish said brand at a pivotal position in the brand’s chosen market. And the brand’s products and services have no doubt been thoroughly conceived and implemented to create a full suite of delightful offerings to prospective and existing customers.

So why then, would they trust you, a badly lazy individual, to spearhead the launch of your service to the affiliate community. The company’s only be going a short while, so it’s not like you’ve even had time to become disheartened enough to completely disengage from all sense of positive action and attitude. I’m sorry, but it is “efforts” like this that keep affiliate managers, in general, at junior to middle management and affiliate programs as the cheap alternative to proper marketing in the eyes of senior management.

Well done sir.

Click the image below if your eyesight isn’t up to scratch…

Dealing with Douchebags

[10:02:58] Affiliate X: Hey Tom, how are you? Jsut a quick follow up with you to see if you had chance to go over the email with the offer we discussed for our facebook tipping page last week?
[10:03:14] Tom Galanis: hi mate
[10:03:20] Tom Galanis: I don’t think I received it
[10:03:26] Tom Galanis: could you send again?
[10:04:09] Affiliate X: Sure, give me a few mins. Will let you know when I have sent it
[10:08:56] Affiliate X: Resent, please confirm you received it. Cheers
[10:09:25] Affiliate X: From XXXXXXXXXXXX@gmail.com
[10:11:55] Tom Galanis: received – could you tell me the following: how big is your email database? how many are active?
[10:12:25] Tom Galanis: bottom line is this – from your proposal, any one of my clients is going to want to work on a CPA basis if you are “guaranteeing 10 customers”
[10:12:53] Affiliate X: It is basically people off the page who have signed upto receiving the horse racing email tips from us. There is around 200 at the moment
[10:12:53] Tom Galanis: I can’t see anyone going for the £500 flat fee
[10:13:19] Affiliate X: Ok mate, I can’t do anything on a CPA basis as we have a few prepaid deals on there and obviously they take priority
[10:13:27] Tom Galanis: to give you an idea, I get anxious about signing off £500 flat fees for a mailshot to 200k databases
[10:13:52] Tom Galanis: 200 potentials is not going to excite them, I’m afraid
[10:14:09] Tom Galanis: so tough to monetise facebook traffic
[10:14:13] Affiliate X: Sure, but it is not just the email that they will be being promoted on mate
[10:14:36] Tom Galanis: I appreciate that, but I can’t see anyone getting 10 customers from the facebook page
[10:15:08] Affiliate X: bxx3xx have with us and Wxxxxxx Hxxx have been working with us for about 2 weeks and have 4 new depositors
[10:15:59] Affiliate X: Not sure why you don’t think any new depositors will come from it. You can’t get anymore targeted to people on a tipping page, can you?
[10:20:10] Tom Galanis: well, how are you generating traffic?
[10:21:07] Tom Galanis: I could get 1045 people to like my dead dog’s funeral page – the question is, how active are they?
[10:21:49] Affiliate X: Mainly through liking comments on other betting related pages which results in them coming to our page and liking ours. You can see how active they are by looking at the page mate
[10:23:00] Tom Galanis: If you’re confident, why not work on a CPA or a revenue share?
[10:23:16] Tom Galanis: I could even give you a percentage of the turnover with one of my clients
[10:23:21] Tom Galanis: far more lucrative
[10:24:07] Affiliate X: The only reason is because I have prepaid deals with 3 other clients and obviously I want to keep them happy and deliver more players for them so they renew with us
[10:24:14] Tom Galanis: I’ll be honest with you. Most affiliates wanting a £500 flat rate – and I’m not labelling you as one – do nothing to warrant it and operators rarely see a return
[10:24:32] Tom Galanis: If you were using the funds to personally fund prizes, then great
[10:24:52] Tom Galanis: so your clients include bxx3xx?
[10:25:30] Affiliate X: I am running a campaign for bxx3xx through a betting portal and I am working with Wxxxxxx Hxxx direct
[10:26:04] Tom Galanis: which portals do you have? I notice a few linked to
[10:27:07] Affiliate X: I don’t have any sites but we have a few being built as we speak. I mean it is a guy that owns a betting portal that is running the bxx3xx campaign through us
[10:27:18] Tom Galanis: Jxxxxxx Bxxxx?
[10:27:41] Affiliate X: Not with the bxx3xx campaign but the racetips and bettingon sites we promote yes
[10:27:56] Tom Galanis: how does that deal work?
[10:28:04] Affiliate X: Flat rate for a month
[10:28:56] Tom Galanis: so how do you make money from bxx3xx?
[10:29:40] Affiliate X: The guy who has the betting portal paid us for 10 new depositing players, like the deal I mentioned to you. We delivered the 10 players and now he has renewed with us for a further 10
[10:29:56] Tom Galanis: ah ok
[10:29:58] Tom Galanis: I see
[10:30:23] Tom Galanis: surely, my interest is dealing directly with them then?
[10:30:37] Tom Galanis: I’ll be getting traffic from their site and also from you
[10:31:00] Affiliate X: Not sure what you mean mate?
[10:31:43] Tom Galanis: well, if I already have a deal in place with the betting portal, I should mention that we’d be keen on seeing some more Facebook traffic
[10:31:48] Tom Galanis: and he’d do the deal with you
[10:31:56] Tom Galanis: takes an element of risk out for me
[10:33:40] Affiliate X: I am not sure he would as I asked him if he wanted to run one of his other brands and he said he just wants to run one at a time
[10:34:25] Affiliate X: It’s totally your call mate, if you want to speak to your clients and see what they say then do it but if you don’t feel comfortable with it then leave it. As I say mate, it’s totally your call
[10:35:48] Tom Galanis: if you’d consider a CPA deal, it’s workable
[10:35:58] Tom Galanis: from your perspective, I can’t see how your model is sustainable
[10:36:10] Tom Galanis: and operators won’t pay an affiliate who isn’t going to hang around
[10:37:32] Affiliate X: I am here for the long haul mate. What makes you think I am not going to hang around?
[10:40:09] Tom Galanis: I can see that’s your intention – but your model isn’t sustainable
[10:40:21] Tom Galanis: bookmakers won’t keep paying you £500 a month
[10:43:01] Affiliate X: It is not necessarily every month. It is when each 10 new punters have been delivered and if we continue to deliver the punters I can’t see why the bookmakers wouldn’t want more?
[10:43:50] Tom Galanis: Surely you would prefer a £51 CPA?
[10:44:55] Affiliate X: Yes, but not while we have prepaid deals in place as they take priority for obvious reasons
[10:45:10] Tom Galanis: but you would earn more money from that CPA?
[10:45:34] Tom Galanis: my point is – eventually, this model will stop delivering players
[10:45:48] Tom Galanis: and you’ll be indebted to bookmakers
[10:45:56] Tom Galanis: I assume you’d pay them back
[10:46:05] Tom Galanis: but others might be a bit more sceptical
[10:46:23] Affiliate X: Yes, but I am not sure why you think it will stop delivering players when there is between 30-50 new likes coming in per day?
[10:46:36] Tom Galanis: a CPA deal offers them security, build trust and a sustainable partnership
[10:48:40] Tom Galanis: the way a lot of affiliate managers will see this is – £500 – that’s not a lot of my budget is it? But if he gets 6 of those deals in every month, that’s a £50k salary
[10:48:49] Tom Galanis: let’s be honest here – the page isn’t a lot of work
[10:49:00] Tom Galanis: 1045 likes doesn’t get me a return
[10:49:24] Tom Galanis: I’m turning down upfront deals for websites that rank 2 or 3 on google for some unbelievable keyword terms
[10:49:57] Tom Galanis: they are far more stable and get considerably more (roughly 1000x) traffic than your page
[10:51:29] Affiliate X: Sure mate, as I mentioned it is totally your call. I am not forcing you into anything but just trying to get my point across by telling you the punters won’t dry up with more new people coming on the page on a daily basis and they are all targeted not just people that are interested in other things but they are interested in betting
[10:53:10] Tom Galanis: I’m sorry. It just won’t work for any of my clients. It’s an unsustainable model and I cannot believe Wxxxxxx Hxxx and bxx3xx are paying to be sat there. Best of luck, but I’m out
[10:53:26] Affiliate X: No worries at all mate
[10:53:33] Affiliate X: Best thing for us to do mate would probably be, if we have any CPA deals become available then to give you a shout but at the moment I can’t run a standard CPA deal over prepaid deals when I have promised players to those that have already paid me
[10:54:42] Tom Galanis: Realistically, you’ll be looking at a £10 CPA from most bookies – customer value from Facebook is so low
[10:55:26] Affiliate X: For what reason is it low?
[10:56:31] Tom Galanis: Customer Values from Facebook are low
[10:56:40] Tom Galanis: bookmakers have stats on all of this
[10:58:42] Affiliate X: Ok mate, we have had a couple of good redepositors across the 2 brands we are working with
[11:01:51] Tom Galanis: 2 redepositors isn’t going to cover £500 though…
[11:02:17] Tom Galanis: you need to remember that bookmakers will be expecting to make at the very least £1500 from a £500 spend
[11:02:39] Tom Galanis: 2 good redepositors won’t do that for anyone, on average
[11:03:10] Tom Galanis: you’ll need to be very lucky – and some of the best affiliates I know have not made that luck through facebook
[11:04:42] Affiliate X: It is 2 good redepositors over a 3 week period, what if another 2 good depositors come in another few weeks, then another 2 and so on?
[11:05:21] Tom Galanis: what if indeed
[11:05:34] Tom Galanis: why not work on a revenue share deal?
[11:05:47] Tom Galanis: this is my point – if you’re confident, you’ll earn more money that way
[11:06:39] Tom Galanis: you’ll also have the bookmakers’ support on any future work
[11:06:43] Tom Galanis: the site, for instance
[11:06:56] Affiliate X: We are confident but we are tied to these deals at the moment as I mentioned and as I said if we ever have any room for a CPA/Rev Share deals then I will contact you but for now we are tied to these deals and our priority is to deliver for them
[11:08:08] Tom Galanis: sincerely, best of luck with that – my advice would be to focus on delivering for Wxxxxxx Hxxx. Those guys are pretty ruthless when it comes to getting money back
[11:09:17] Affiliate X: We are over halfway to delivering what we promised to them mate and they have only been running with us for 2 weeks, in another 2 weeks the first campaign will be done and dusted
[11:09:28] Tom Galanis: great stuff

Escalation: Argentine style

This is my story of the week. The UK sends Prince William and a f*ck off destroyer to the Falklands and the Argies, realising they do have a considerably weaker armed force (unlike 30 years ago) have decided to hit us where they know they can beat us. Football.

They have renamed their football league the General Belgrano League. Superb.

Now watch the UK bookmakers hit back with specials on last year’s General Belgrano Division 1 runner-up Lanus’ Copa Libertadores clash with Brazilian side Flamenco:

“If Flamenco sink General Belgrano side Lanus, we’ll refund all losing bets”.

I’m copyrighting that one by the way…

Gross to Net Deductions justified at Betfred Casino

To all affiliates who (love to) question the deductions operators make when taking their gross win numbers to a net revenue on which affiliates are paid, take a look at the latest press release at Betfred, where an affiliated customer nailed the Beach Life slot progresssive yesterday for the tune of £5.1 million.

Now, progressive jackpot contributions made by operators are often bundled into this gross to net conversion rate at a fixed percentage. Try telling the affiliate whose player hit the jackpot that this isn’t worth it… imagine seeing 30% or so of £5.1 million coming off your earnings.

Said affiliate would stand to gain from any of the money the player decides to drop back to the house too.

There was a recent thread on GPWA explaining a recent change to Betfred’s gross to net conversion (for the better actually) that caused the odd infuriated post to emerge.

Justice for the affiliate program and the affiliate manager on this one